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  • Native American Superstitions
    By John Ventre

    I’ve never had any contact with Native Americans other than when I took my kids to Lake Powell and one evening attended the movie airing of Wind Talkers with Nicholas Cage in 2002. It was pretty cool since the theater was full of Native Americans who proudly boasted that the movie was filmed here in this town. Wind Talkers were Native Americans who during WWII broke the Japanese codes and conversely, the Japanese couldn’t break their language.
    There are 300 different Native American tribes and the tribes with the most legends are the Blackfoot with 63, Apache with 31 and the Algonquin with 24. A common belief, like their medicine wheel, is that everything in life is circular and repeats itself with cause and effect.
    I started out in this field in 1996 researching end time prophecy for my first novel, 12/21/2012 A Prophecy. The Hopi (500 BC) would perform a Kachina dance and believed they could control the weather, nature and could send messages to the spirit world. They believe a Blue Star will strike earth and that sacred ones would arrive on a flying shield. They correctly predicted that we would speak through spider webs (phone lines), ride in horseless carriages (cars) and that women would wear men’s clothes.
    Mayan Prophecy (300 BC) spoke of ETs creating us, an accurate calendar that correctly took into account for the earths 72 year one degree wobble and spoke of Kukulcan, a blond hair blue eyed Caucasian male, who rose from the sea to give them this knowledge. King Pachal’s sarcophagus depicts him riding on some sort or machine.
    Their legends include:
    Sasquatch (Bigfoot) who can materialize or dematerialize at will. He would trade with the natives and often steal woman who he mated with. He is 9-11 feet tall and the size of an Alaskan Brown Bear. He can communicate through grunts and gestures.
    Cherokee Little People who are similar to fairies. There are three types; vindictive, helpful or mischievous.
    Dream catchers would catch bad dreams and let good dreams in.
    Their Medicine Man is spiritual and herbal with supernatural powers to ward off evil spirits. They will not discuss their practices with us.
    Navajo Skinwalkers are witches that can transform into animals. They were originally human but committed a great crime like killing a family member. They are greatly feared. The only way to kill a Skinwalker is to dip an arrow or bullet into white ash and shoot it.
    Werewolves are a New York Mohawk legend and the movie The Howling depicted a colony of Native American werewolves near San Diego.
    The Wendigo devours humans and was once a man hundreds of years ago. They are eight feet tall with antlers and a man’s hairy body with claws.
    Two-Face is a Sioux-Omaha-Lakota creature with a face that is half beautiful and half deformed. It uses razor sharp elbows to kill.
    The Cherokee Horned Water Serpent is similar to an anaconda. You must remove the seventh scale in order to kill it.
    The Mayan Death Bat has a human head and a bat body. They have a Batman like comic book character named Camazotz. The Iroquois have a similar flying skull creature.
    The Stiff Legged Bear is fifteen feet tall and used to prevent humans from crossing the Bering Strait. It was the size of an elephant and could run thirty miles per hour.
    The Owl Women are Yakama cave creatures with human bodies, owl faces and talons.
    Thunder birds are like flying pterodactyls.
    There is a Zombie Indian Hunter that can be activated by spilling blood on its arrow tip. It utilizes black ghost crows.
    Native burial rites vary across the country. In the Plains and Northwest they bury above ground. Along the Mississippi they use burial mounds. In the southwest and southeast they cremate. All customs believe the dead must not be disturbed.
    All tribes have ghost stories of spirit interaction with relatives or people who have been wronged. They also have many UFO stories with Star People. Two Navajo Rangers, Lt John Dover and Stan Milford have come forward. They have encountered coins falling from the ceiling on ghost investigations. They have encountered EMF’s from a car where a woman was followed by an orb and saw a large owl in her driveway. They also investigated circular digs around a man’s desert home after he saw a craft and creatures at his window.
    In 1989, I moved to Oklahoma and heard three sets of three footsteps on my living room ceiling and an Indian male chant in the hallway. My question is not is Native American Superstitions real but are they a form of pagan witchcraft?

    More at JohnVentre.com
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